languages and literatures of the non-Russian peoples of the Soviet Union

papers and proceedings of the Tenth Annual Conference organized by the Interdepartmental Committee on Communist and East European Affairs, McMaster University, held at Hamilton, Ontario, on October 22 and 23, 1976

Publisher: The Committee in [Hamilton, Ont

Written in English
Published: Pages: 317 Downloads: 25
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Places:

  • Soviet Union,
  • Soviet literature

Subjects:

  • Soviet Union -- Languages -- Congresses.,
  • Soviet literature -- History and criticism -- Congresses.

Edition Notes

Statementedited by George Thomas.
ContributionsThomas, George, 1945-, McMaster University. Interdepartmental Committee on Communist and East European Affairs., Canada Council.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsP381.S59 L36 1977
The Physical Object
Paginationx, 317 p. :
Number of Pages317
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3006069M
LC Control Number84673327

Playing Soviet: Playing Soviet: The Visual Languages of Early Soviet Children’s Books () is “an interactive database of children’s book illustrations draws the little-known and rarely-seen Soviet children’s books from the Cotsen Collection at Princeton’s Firestone Library. The featured illustrations have been selected and. In the case when a writer "transalates" his own book into his own native language it's safe to say the book was written twice in 2 languages. We read this "translation" here.(by the way "Lolita" was THE ONLY English novel of him which he "translated" into Russian himself. Russian literature, the body of written works produced in the Russian language, beginning with the Christianization of Kievan Rus in the late 10th century. The unusual shape of Russian literary history has been the source of numerous controversies. Three major and sudden breaks divide it into four.   Bela Shayevich, the book’s English translator, said “Secondhand Time” was “an update of 19th-century Russian literature for the 21st century.” People read Russian novels not for the.

Russia, Russland, Soviet Union, USSR, Sowjietunion. Lot of Philatelic Literature about Soviet Union Illustrated Postal Stationery 1.“Rossija Filatelie, Soviet Postal Stationery ” by Gerrie Coerts & Lina Nizova. pages, softbound book, 8” x 5 ¾ “, 2 nd edition, published Sept. , Netherlands. Text is in English Seller Rating: % positive. She is the author of the monograph We Modern People: Science Fiction and the Making of Russian Modernity (Wesleyan University Press, ) and is currently completing a second book titled The Chernobyl Effect. SPEAKERS: B. Amarilis Lugo de Fabritz is the Master Instructor for Russian at Howard University’s Department of World Languages and.   A general account of the languages of the Soviet Union, one of the most diverse multinational and multilingual states in the world as well as one of the most important. There are some languages spoken in the USSR, belonging to five main families and ranging from Russian, which is the first language of about ,, people, to Aluet Reviews: 1.

languages and literatures of the non-Russian peoples of the Soviet Union Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. The languages and literatures of the non-Russian peoples of the Soviet Union: papers and proceedings of the Tenth Annual Conference organized by the Interdepartmental Committee on Communist and East European Affairs, McMaster University, held at Hamilton, Ontario, on October 22 [George Thomas; McMaster University.

Language Policy in the former Soviet Union. Handout for LINGLanguage Policy compulsary learning of Russian in all non-Russian schools. Even so, there was resistance to the borrowing from Russian, and some languages were more successful, e.g.

Moldavian (actually a dialect of Romanian) which has borrowed freely from Romanian for. The languages of the Soviet Union are hundreds of different languages and dialects from several different language groups.

Init was decreed that all nationalities in the Soviet Union had the right to education in their own language. The new orthography used the Cyrillic, Latin, or Arabic alphabet, depending on geography and culture. Afterall languages that had received new. some aspects of the education of the non-Russian peoples in the Soviet Union by an-alyzing the teaching of their religion, their languages, literary traditions, and historical heritage.

First, however, a few preliminary remarks on the status of those peoples and Soviet policy toward them. The great numerical imbalance between. Russification or Russianization (Russian: Русификация, Rusifikatsiya) is a form of cultural assimilation process during which non-Russian communities (whether involuntarily or voluntarily) give up their culture and language in favor of Russian culture.

In a historical sense, the term refers to both official and unofficial policies of Imperial Russia and the Soviet Union with.

A general account of the languages of the Soviet Union, one of the most diverse multinational and multilingual states in the world as well as one of the most important.

There are some languages spoken in the USSR, belonging to five main families and ranging from Russian, which is the first language of aboutpeople, to Aluet, spoken only by 96 (in the census).

An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video. An illustration of an audio speaker.

People; Search Metadata Full text of "Soviet But Not Russian: The ‘Other’ Peoples of the Soviet Union" See other formats.

1 See Jaffe () and Schieffelin () for similar analyses of the political implications of alph ; 2 This chapter begins to address the question of why people in the former Soviet Union think that language equals culture.

It describes how Soviet nationalities policies made a direct link between languages, groups of people, and resource allocation based upon a cultural evolutionary model. The Red Book of the Peoples of the Russian Empire is a book about the small nations of the Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Russia and some other post-Soviet states of today.

It was published in Estonian in and in English in The foreword of the book explains the book's approach by saying, "the authors of the present book, who come from a country (Estonia) which has shared. Priscilla Perkins, Column Editor Regional Surveys Windows on the East: A Selective List of Current English-Language Serials on the Soviet Union Thomas Townsend Townsend is Head of Serials Processing the Iowa State University Library in Ames.

at Whether in the guise of Old Muscovy, Tsarist Empire, or Soviet state, Russia has always exerted a powerful fascination upon Westerners.

Circulation. In the Soviet Union published more than 8, daily newspapers in approximately sixty languages, with a combined circulation of about million. Every all-union newspaper was circulated in its Russian language version. Nearly 3, newspapers, however, reached the population in non-Russian languages, constituting roughly 25 percent of the total circulation, although non.

This book deals with the language of 14 non-Russian republics, examining how their speakers struggle to maintain those languages as an integral part of their cultures.

There are 19 chapters in five parts. After (1) "On Language," part 1, "The Western Borderlands," includes: (2) "Ukraine: The Little Russians"; (3) "Belarus: The White Russians"; and (4) "Moldova: The Soviet Union's Romance.

Russian literature refers to the literature of Russia and its émigrés and to Russian-language literature. The roots of Russian literature can be traced to the Middle Ages, when epics and chronicles in Old East Slavic were composed.

By the Age of Enlightenment, literature had grown in importance, and from the early s, Russian literature underwent an astounding golden age in poetry, prose. It didn't force, but it rather encouraged the use of Russian to the detriment of other languages. * In the Warsaw pact countries Russian was used as an international language (when travelling abroad or talking to foreigners).

Few people knew Engl. After the fall of the Soviet Union, a. ethnic conflicts and separatist movements threatened stability. most Soviet satellites chose to remain part of Russia. the nation achieved a level of stability never seen before. most Russians wanted to return to the Soviet system.

Between andbooks by Chekhov have been published in the Soviet Union times in editions totalling million thousand copies in 92 languages spoken by the peoples of the USSR and other countries all over the world.

An educational reform adopted in initiated a long process of curtailment of Ukrainian-language instruction in schools. In the new party program emphasized the importance of the Russian language for the integration of the Soviet peoples and spoke of the diminishing significance Read More; policies of.

Catherine II. Intended to aid librarians in small- and medium-sized libraries and media centers, this annotated bibliography lists 1, books focusing on the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. The book is divided into four parts: (1) "General and Interrelated Themes--Union of the Soviet Socialist Republics and Eastern European Countries"; (2) "Russian Empire Prior to and the USSR"; (3) "USSR--Non.

Through the history of the Soviet Union, both doctrine and practice on ethnic distinctions within the Soviet population varied over ty national cultures were not completely abolished in the Soviet Union.

The Soviet definition had national cultures to be "socialist by content and national by form" and used to promote the official aims and values of the state. The Languages of the Former Soviet Republics describes the evolution of each of the languages of the 14 non-Russian Soviet republics paying particular attention to periods of Russification during the Tsarist and Soviet eras.

in the former Soviet Union or language in general, this book will be a tremendous resource for professors and. The Languages of the Former Soviet Republics describes the evolution of each of the languages of the 14 non-Russian Soviet republics paying particular attention to periods of Russification during the Tsarist and Soviet eras.

Non-linguistic in content, Gary C. Fouse delves into languages that other authors frequently overlook or ignore, and documents first hand accounts of native-speakers.

The father of the Soviet Union was also a Latin buff who adored Goethe and liked to compare his enemies to figures in novels Passion for the classics. Russian language, culture, and politics play an important role beyond Central and Eastern Europe, affecting the international community as a whole.

To develop an understanding of this complex country and its people, students pursuing a B.A. in Russian Language, Literature, and Culture start with intensive language study. But by the end of the decade, both Ermolaeva and the book’s author, Aleksandr Ivanovich Vvedenskiĭ, fell victim to one of Stalin’s purges.

Memories of Soviet children’s literature linger today. ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: xx, pages: map ; 24 cm: Contents: 1 Introduction Altaic languages Uralic languages Indo-European languages Caucasian languages Paleosiberian and other languages --Appendix 1 Ethnic and linguistic composition of the U.S.S.R.

according to the census --Appendix 2 Ethnic. Russia - Russia - Soviet Russia: The following is a general overview of the history of Russia during the period of Soviet domination.

For full coverage of the history of the Soviet Union, see the article Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. The February Revolution of was spontaneous, leaderless, and fueled by deep resentment over the economic and social conditions that had prevailed in. Languages of the Soviet Union book.

Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. A general account of the languages of the Soviet Union, one /5(1). The chapters follow theory and criticism into the s with examinations of the Union of Soviet Writers, semantic paleontology, and socialist realism under Stalin. A more "humanized" literary criticism appeared during the ravaging years of World War II, only to be supplanted by a return to the party line, Soviet heroism, and anti-Semitism in.

Starting after the Second World War and taking the story through to the Brezhnev era, Yoram Gorlizki and Oleg Khlevniuk's Substate Dictatorship: Networks, Loyalty, and Institutional Change in the Soviet Union (Yale University Press, ) charts the strategies of Soviet regional leaders, paying particular attention to the forging and evolution of local trust networks.

Benjamin Nathans teaches and writes about Imperial Russia and the Soviet Union, modern European Jewish history, and the history of human edited A Research Guide to Materials on the History of Russian Jewry (19th and Early 20th Centuries) in Selected Archives of the Former Soviet Union [in Russian] (Moscow, ) and is author of Beyond the Pale: The Jewish Encounter With Late.

fluency" in the literature of foreign language methodology. What we are dealing with in Prof. Bartley's book, then, could more accurately be described as "Soviet approaches to intensive foreign language education." The word "foreign" in this case distinguishes the many non-Russian languages found in the Soviet Union from national lan.Russian is the official language of million people in the Russian Federation.

It is also an invaluable tool for anyone interested in the newly independent countries that were formerly part of the Soviet Union: Ukraine, Belarus, Moldova, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tadzhikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan.Visit our online store to order literary criticism, russian & former soviet union in bulk.

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